Blogs for poets, writers and all communicators in Christ

When I began this blog on my website, I’d hoped to collect in one place my posts from other blogs. Now that I’ve seen the site only retains prior posts for a limited time, I hope you’ll follow my individual blogs that interest you.

Bible Prayers – brings you prayerfully paraphrased (pray-a-phrased) prayers from the Bible – prayers you can pray in community or alone, knowing you automatically have “prayer partners,” now and from centuries past. These actual prayers from God’s Word have since been collected in a book with many, many more added, but if you “Follow” the blog, you’ll know when the book has been published and new posts resumed.

Bible Reviewer – reviews new editions of English translations, study Bibles, biblical resources, and Bibles for children. Scroll through the posts to find the edition that speaks clearly to you. And, if you want to give the gift of God’s Word to someone else, these reviews will help you to decide which to order.

My personal blog on Blogspot  discusses Bible topics, various aspects of Christianity, sermon tips, devotionals, writing tips and topics based on decades of writing, revising, and having my work accepted by numerous editors and publishers.

Poetry Editor on poetry – focuses on poetry techniques useful in all genres of writing, traditional poetry forms, free verse, unique terms used by poets, and things to consider when writing, revising, marketing, and publishing your poems.

 

First Love, God

In Matthew 10:37, Jesus made a puzzling statement: “People who love their father or mother more than Me are not worthy of Me. Those who love a son or daughter more than Me are not worthy of Me.”

To keep that hard saying of Jesus in context, however, He showed us a bigger picture in Matthew 22:37-39: “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and all your soul and all your mind. This is the first and great commandment, and the second is like it. You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

Clearly God wants us to love other people and ourselves very much but not put what they want –or what we want – before anything God wants.

What does God want? Who can possibly know without knowing what God says? And so, Jesus urged His followers to listen to God. Quoting from the Torah (Jewish law) He commanded: “Hear, O Israel.”

Known as the Shema (Hebrew word for listen), the full commandment in Deuteronomy 6:4-9 says: “Hear, oh Israel, listen! The Lord our God is the one and only Lord! Therefore, you must love the Lord with all your heart, all your soul, and all your strength. Keep these words I am commanding you today in your hearts and on your minds. Repeat them to your children. Talk about them when you sit around your house and when you go out, when you lie down and when you get up. Tie them on your hand as a sign, and put them on your forehead as a symbol. Write them on the doorposts of your home and on your gates.”

As these Bible verses show, God wants us to use everyday opportunities and experiences to show our children, friends, and neighbors our beliefs. Even strangers who knock on our doors will be able to see that we belong to the Almighty Lord God and Father of Love if we have symbols and signs of God all around our yards and houses. A lawn statue, a Bible verse plaque, a cross on the wall, or a dust-free Bible on a table can openly but quietly attest to our love for God in a way that people can see as soon as they enter our homes. More importantly, those same signs, symbols, or icons also remind us to love God and to put God first and foremost – in our relationships, decisions, our daily activities, and even our décor.

Prayer: Dear Lord God, help us to love You more and put You before anyone or anything else at any time. Help us to listen and really hear what You have to say to us. Help us especially to see how You first loved us so much that You gave up Your only Son for us, so we could forever be Your beloved children too. We thank You and praise You, O Lord God, for your ongoing love.

Mary Harwell Sayler, from her book What the Bible Says About Lovecontemporary paraphrases of the scriptures on love interspersed with short devotionals

What the Bible Says About Love: scriptural prayer-a-phrases

Symbols: Water and Fire

Scriptures for Sunday, January 13:
Isaiah 43:1-7
Psalm 29
Acts 8:14-17
Luke 3:15-17 and 21-22

Pop quiz!

If I ask you to name a symbol – any symbol – what do you think of immediately?

A symbol can bring to mind something we all understand – like the symbol of a cross, a wedding ring, the sign of the fish – or it can be unique to ourselves. For example, you probably wouldn’t guess a personal symbol that represents something memorable to me: a cold baked potato! For me, that potato symbolizes amazing generosity because of something that happened years ago.

When I was growing up, my family lived on the top of a hill in a very nice but modest house. Running perpendicular to our street, another road ended in an unpaved path that trailed off into an overgrown, unkempt wooded area where small, weathered cabins were scattered here and there. For some reason, people called the place “Kinney Town.” And, every so often, one or two girls would come up the hill, knock on our front door, and ask Mother is she had any shoes or clothes that my sisters and I had outgrown. Somehow, Mother always had something to give.

One day, when I followed my mother to the door, one of the girls asked if I wanted to come to her house. Our of curiosity, I did, and Mother said yes. So I went down to Kinney Town and into an unlit one-room shack with no furniture that I can remember, except for a pot-bellied wood-stove that stood, black and cold, in the dark room. Atop that stove was – you guessed it – a cold baked potato, which the girls offered me and which, decades later became to me a symbol of incredible generosity and the impetus for this short poem:

Down Kinney Town

Feet bare, the girls came up today,
and Mama gave them ouch-grown shoes
that once belonged to me or Kay,
but, oh, I longed to give them too.

Two girls they were: soiled blonde, unkempt –
not like Mama’s girls who shone
in new sewn clothes and often dreamt
of finer galaxies than home.

With clean hands bare, could I, a child,
share much with girls from a small shack, wild?
But one said, “Come,” so I went down –
down the tangled path to Kinney Town.

Theirs was adventure I could play.
A cold potato rationed me –
eyeless, grown in soil, unbent. They
gave that last leftover. Free.
I took.
Then home I went with backward look.

Mary Harwell Sayler, (c) 1985, 2019, all rights reserved.

Over a half-century later, I still like cold baked potatoes, but I wish I knew what happened to those girls after we moved away. I pray God rewarded their sweet, giving spirits. And I pray God gives each of you equally memorable symbols to remind you of important mile-stones and character-building, life-changing moments in your lives.

God started this, you know! God invented and initiated the use of symbol – probably because God knows how easily we forget! So, the Bible offers a variety of symbols to remind us of those spirit-building moments in our lives and other matters of faith.

The scripture readings today included two symbols often used in the Bible – water and fire. Normally, when we think of fire and water, we don’t think of them as symbols, but as unique substances with distinctive characteristics and accomplishments.

For instance, we know that water is two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen, and that H2O has the ability to refresh, purify, and cleanse. Water quenches our thirst and replenishes a vital element in our bodies without which we would die! Water washes our clothes, our cars, our hair, our houses, and water puts out fires.

Fire! This other symbol in today’s readings also has substance and practical purposes. For example, fire purifies and purges. It warms us, comforts us, and heats our water for a nice cup of tea.

Fire also burns. Sears. Scorches. Torches. It can grill a hamburger or set a forest ablaze. Fire ignites, but it also lights. Candles, the glow of a fireplace, a lit lantern help us to see.

But how do these symbols relate to our lives – or more specifically, our lives in God? What does the Bible show us in the scriptures?

In Isaiah 43, we glimpsed the possibility of suffering – of drowning, of being overwhelmed, of being burnt. But immediately God makes a promise! God’s Word says, “Do not fear! I have redeemed you. I have called you by your name for you are Mine! When you pass through the waters, I will be with you, and the rivers will not overwhelm you. When you walk through fire, you won’t be burned. The flames will not consume you.”

Is God asking us to remember the example of the “Burning Bush” Moses saw – the bush that kept throwing off light, warmth and power but never got burned up or burnt out? Are fire and the burning bush symbols God uses to help us remember who we are as the light of Christ, the light on the hill?

Our Gospel reading from the third chapter of Luke bring fire and water together as we listen to the word John the Baptist gave people who came to hear his message. As John said, “One more powerful than I is coming, and I’m not worthy to even loosen His sandals! I’ll baptize you with water, but He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.”

The Gospel reading goes on to tell us that Jesus did indeed come to be baptized by John in the Jordan River – not because He needed to repent and have His sins washed away by baptism as we do, but because He set an example for us to follow.

Why? Maybe it’s because baptism gives us a symbol – an icon, a picture – of a precise moment in time we remember as having committed ourselves to God while making a public declaration that lets others know what we believe and where we stand.

Baptism acts as a personal symbol and a communal one as we gather in worship with others who have confessed their belief in Jesus Christ and been baptized too. Baptism also connects us with Bible people and our biblical heritage as it symbolizes Noah’s protection from the flood and reminds us that, like God’s people in the Exodus from Egypt, our Almighty God and Father will part the Red Sea for us and will do all that’s needed to redeem us and free us from whatever enslaves.

As Luke 3:21-22 tells us, the heavens opened as Jesus was praying on His baptismal day, and the Holy Spirit descended on Him like a dove – another symbol. And The Voice said, “This is My beloved Son in Whom I Am well-pleased.”

Through the water of baptism, God also proclaim us as His beloved children! As we enter those waters, God refreshes us spiritually, mentally, and physically, bringing us forgiveness, healing, and a new life in Christ.

For some of you, however, baptism might have been initiated by your parents, who believed in one Lord, one faith, one baptism, and wanted to give you a head-start, spiritually. If so, your personal profession of faith most likely came later, perhaps at your confirmation or your decision to go forward one Sunday and pledge your life to Christ as people prayed for you.

Regardless, the water of baptism symbolizes cleansing, purification, and a new start. But what about the symbol of fire? How does that affect us, spiritually?

Are we all fired up for God?

Do we feel like we – along with other Christians – have come under fire from others?

Shall we suspect that the fiery trials in our lives might be a purifying test from God?

One or more of those experiences or concerns could be true for us, but no matter what, those of us who have given our lives to Christ need to worry about being thrown into the everlasting fires of hell.

Jesus Christ Himself sets us afire with His Holy Spirit, but it’s a controlled burn, for Jesus Christ is the Living Water – the vital, life-giving, spiritually refreshing, purifying, healing waters of our lives.

Dear Heavenly Father, we praise You for Your gifts of water, fire, and an ongoing life of forgiving love in Your Son, Jesus Christ. Help us to be vessels for You, Lord. Fill our cup with You, and give us the opportunities this coming week to offer a cool cup of water to everyone You bring to us in Jesus’ Name.

 

 

 

Christmas poems from PRAISE!

Adore, adore our coming Lord
– the Greatness
of Almighty God
arriving
in a newborn Child –
a baby boy
named Jesus,
Who cries for you
to hold Him close
and cradles you
like an infant.

 

When God gave us Jesus
 – the One Who would save us –
Heaven could not contain itself.

Light spilled from a star,
heralding His arrival.

The earth burst into life.
Birds called for revival.

Morning Glories began
to bloom in the night chill,

and frightened
shepherds
trembled like sheep
when angels awakened
their sleep with song

as light as snowflakes,
as powerful as a
Tsunami of harmony
pouring onto the earth
at Jesus’ birth.

Oh, praise Him!

 

Oh, come! Let us celebrate
the birth of the Christ-Child
Who rejoices at our rebirth.

The Holy Infant Jesus –
dependent
on us for His care –
shows us
how we must
come to Him
like trusting children.

Hold Him on your lap
with love,
and let Him hug you,
heal you,
and hum a lullaby.

 

Praise You, Jesus, for showing us God
Whom
I could no more picture than
helium
in a balloon,

but You gave us fresh vision
of God flesh,
bones, blood,
and body cells
drawn as circular wells, filled
with love and life and living water.

 

Poems by Mary Harwell Sayler from poetry book PRAISE!

All rights reserved. Use only with proper acknowledgement.
Better yet, buy the book from
Amazon or Cladach Publishing
and have a blessed Christmas!

 

 

 

Bible Talk: What do we have to offer?

Scripture Readings for November 18, 2018

1 Samuel 1:4-20
Psalm 16
Hebrews 10:11-14, 15-18, 19-25
Mark 13:1-8

Every Sunday we read scriptures, which usually include a Psalm, from the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible.) Then from the New Testament, we read a letter to the early Christians and a passage from the Gospels. We select these Bible verses from the ones suggested for the week in the Revised Common Lectionary, which is used by many churches and denominations all over the world. So, for one day a week anyway, we are literally on the same page as other Christians.

There’s unity in that, but also diversity. In other words, we each hear the same passages from the Bible, but each of us will most likely notice something unique to us, something personal, or something that leaps out from the Living Word of God and speaks to us, individually, but also corporately as one Body of Christ. For example, God’s Word might evoke a reminder of something we’ve been taught or give us a new insight or bring to our mind the thought of doing something differently from what we’ve done (or not done) in the past.

Very often God speaks to us quietly – like a mere impression or unexpected idea. Those impressions that come to mind as we read the Bible ourselves or hear it read in church and Bible study are like the Lord’s way of helping us to apply God’s Word and will to our lives. For example, reading the scriptures suggested for today brought to mind a word that seems to connect one Bible passage to another, thereby giving a theme for this Bible Talk, “offer.”

The most obvious example is when Hannah offered her child to God – even before he was born! Then the Psalmist reminds us that God offers us protection. Then the New Testament epistle to the Hebrews recaps how Jewish priests offered sacrifices to God every day even though that didn’t remove sin forever. And so, God came to us in Jesus Christ to offer Himself as the sacrifice that He himself required. What wonderful offerings we see in those highlights from today’s Bible readings! But let’s look closer.

Hannah didn’t just suddenly offer her son. She didn’t even have one! What she did have was frustration, sadness, grief, and the emotions anyone might get when ridiculed and mocked to the breaking point. Eventually, she couldn’t take it any more. She could no longer tolerate the way she felt nor the way she was being treated by society, by her husband’s other wife, and even by her husband, who loved her but met her grief with the insensitive remark: “Don’t I mean more to you than 10 sons?”

Now, this had been going on for a long time and had probably been building and building the hurts, grief, and resentments inside Hannah for many years – at least enough years for her husband to take a second wife and have several children with that pesky woman!

But then in today’s story in 1 Samuel, Hannah has had it! At long last, she pours out her heart to God, and there, in the Temple, she offers up her disappointments and woundedness. She offers up herself and her desire for a son. And THEN, she offers up the child she asks God to give her – even though she doesn’t have him yet!

Meanwhile, the priest Eli is watching. Since people usually prayed aloud in the Temple, Eli initially offered Hannah his judgment, condemnation, and call to repent! But, by then Hannah was on a roll. She didn’t respond to her husband who thought he ought to be worth more than 10 kids, but she did respond to Eli to set the record straight. She offered the priest what she had offered God – her honesty. She told him how she’d been feeling and how she had poured out those pent-up emotions, so she no longer felt anxious or worthless, but she didn’t want Eli to think she was worthless either.

The priest believed her. He offered up a prayer for her. He offered a blessing and told her to go in peace, and she did. Now that she had laid the negatives in her life at the altar, she was freed of the past and free to conceive of all she had asked for! God gave her a child, a son – Samuel, whom Hannah offered up to God. She went on to have other children, but, raised in the Temple with Eli to teach him, Samuel became the son offered to God and, eventually, the man offered by God to the people, for Samuel became a priest, a judge, and a prophet who could be trusted to be honest, to hear God, and speak the truth – something God’s people had not witnessed for a long time!

When it comes to offerings, God started it!

As Psalm 16 reminded us, God offers us His protection, spiritually and mentally – and often physically too. Then, like the Psalmist, we in turn offer our thanks to God as well as offering our faith and trust.

In today’s reading from the letter to the Hebrews, we’re reminded how the Jewish priests offered daily sacrifices to God – an ongoing bloody mess that didn’t remove sin beyond that day. And so, when the time was right, God offered Himself as The Sacrifice to end all blood-sacrifices forever.

Jesus’ offering ended the need for blood sacrifices on the Temple altar – animal sacrifices which had been offered year after year with no cost to the priests or people, other than the loss of an unblemished, healthy animal. The cost to Jesus was His life – His blood. This not only made everything right between God and us, it removed the need for the Temple as the only place designated to offer sacrifices.

Remember last month’s readings about King David and how he longed to build God a temple? He gathered supplies and made big plans, but God chose David’s son Solomon to commission and oversee the actual building. The grand temple that resulted became the magnificent Temple in Jerusalem, beautifully built of the finest materials, thick walls, and humongous stones! But, as the Gospel of Mark, reported centuries later, Jesus let His followers know the Temple was coming down, and a few decades later, it did.

The famous Western Wall of the Temple, now known as the Wailing Wall, still stands as a place and a pilgrimage where God’s people offer their prayers (including wails!) as Hannah had done. However, the Temple was no longer needed for animal sacrifices or tears or worship because, as the Body of Christ, WE the Church ARE the Temple of God. And so, as the letter to the Hebrews told us, at any time in any place in any circumstances, we can approach the Almighty God as only priests could once do. First though, we must be open to receive what God offers!

Thanks to the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, God offers us forgiveness, guidance, and empowerment in this life with eternal life to come or to be more accurate, with our relationship with God continuing forever, so even death cannot break that unending bond.

For now however, God offers to write on our hearts what God wants of us. As the letter to the Hebrews said, “I will put my laws in their hearts, and I will write them on their minds.” Now that’s an offer we don’t want to refuse!

When we’re open to all God offers us, we can come to the Lord like a beloved child who freely approaches a kind and loving Father. We can receive more fully God’s kindness, comfort, forgiveness, and love, and then we can offer the same to the people with whom God places us in contact – our families, our neighbors, our church fellowship, the clerk in the store, and the stranger on the street, which brings us to the bottom line:

Anything and everything good that we have to offer – to God, to other people, or to ourselves – first came to us from God. So what we have to offer is God’s offerings or gifts to us.

Dear Heavenly Father and Most Generous and Loving God, thank You for offering to help us in every aspect of our lives. Help us to receive Your gracious gifts with thanksgiving and love in Jesus’ Name.

 

Is Every Trial a Court Case?

Scripture Readings and my Bible Talk for October 28, 2018:

Job 42:1-6, 10-17
Psalm 34
Hebrews 7:23-28
Mark 10:46-52

This month we’ve been reading about the trials Job experienced, and, like him, we’ve been trying to make some sense of all his tribulations – and maybe our trials too. To get a better understanding of what’s going on, the word “Trial” is key, because the book, which is one of the oldest in the Bible, begins with God’s holding a heavenly court that Satan attends.

The next thing we know, God and Satan are challenging one another in court by putting Job’s faith on trial. One devastation leads to another and another until Job has lost his herds, his children, his health, and his good standing among his friends and community. Even his wife tells him to give it up, curse God, and die!

Fortunately, Job doesn’t do that. He continues to say he’s done nothing wrong that he’s aware of and certainly nothing to deserve this terrible wreckage of everything he holds dear.

At first, his friends show empathy. They sit with him in silence for a whole week, saying nothing as Job mourns his life and losses. This seems totally right, for In such awful circumstances there’s really nothing to say. But being there matters.

Eventually, Job breaks the silence with a lengthy lament after which one of his friends asks if it’d be okay for him to say something. He does and a trial among friends begins. Job maintains his innocence, while his friends keep trying to get him to realize he must have done something wrong, and if he’d just remember and confess, everything would surely get better, and they could all go home.

In defense of Job’s friends, the truth is that much of what they say is good counsel, particularly for the times and understanding of God. The problem is, their advice just does not apply to Job’s situation. So, in a way, the friends themselves are on trial for lack of faith in Job and, maybe, for fear that strange and terrible things will also happen to them if they’re unable to solve the timeless mystery and perplexing question of why, God, why?

The debate continues with reasonable arguments on every side, but many chapters later, the mystery still has not been solved. Of course, none of the contestants knows there’s a trial going on in the heavenly court – a trial to test the sincerity of Job’s faith, but also a trial between good and evil, life and death.

Ironically, in this great debate, God Himself is on trial! In essence, Satan accuses God of buying faith and loyalty with bunches of blessings, such as He’s given Job. Another irony, perhaps, is that God has faith in Job’s faith!

Think of it! Job’s friends betrayed him by not believing in him, even though Job himself continued to believe in God. But amazingly, God allowed these trials because God had faith in Job! God believed in Job!

As Job faces the temporary nature of his life, health, wealth, and family versus the timelessness of God, He catches a glimpse of the court case that exists between time and eternity. How different those perspectives are! Confined by time and space, who can truly understand the infinite time and space of God?

At some point in the book – which challenges conventional thinking and the tendency to lock God into a box – Job realizes he needs a mediator, an advocate, a good lawyer – someone to stand between himself and God and plead his case with understanding and empathy.

Centuries later, God’s own Son Jesus became that Advocate for us – the Perfect Mediator between us and our Holy God. For Job though, there was no advocate but himself. And then, ironically again, God appointed Job to be the advocate for his friends. As our reading in Job 42:10 tells us, God restored Job’s family, flocks, and fortunes once he had forgiven and prayed for his friends. Job became the mediator between them and God as he interceded for them in prayer.

The mystery of God is never completely solved for Job or for us, nor can it be, but, like Job, we can see that God’s ways are not the same as ours – God’s ways are far higher, all-seeing, and infinite while our lives are boxed in by time and space. God is interested in results for eternity, not just solutions to present-day problems. And so, we might say, eternity is on trial with time!

The important thing, though, is that when Job sees God he no longer focuses on his own circumstances. The pain and loss no longer seem endless for matter doesn’t matter in infinity.

What remains? Faith. Hope. Love. And ongoing fellowship and communion with God.

Although Job didn’t have the opportunity to meet Christ, he believed – as did the psalmist who wrote today’s reading in Psalm 34, which says, “the Lord redeems the life of God’s people, and no one who takes refuge in God will be condemned.”

But neither should we, who take refuge in God, condemn anyone else. As Job discovered, God wanted him to forgive his friends and restore their relationship by praying an intercessory prayer for them. If Job had refused, there’s a good chance his misery would not have improved, but he obeyed God’s request and, in turn, prayed for his friends, who had wronged him.

We, too, have wronged God. Everyone has. And so, we need the intercessory prayers of One Whose faith in God has been proven to be pure and firm. We need One Whose flawless life, given totally to God, makes our sacrifices puny and unnecessary. We need Jesus Christ, the One in Whom we take refuge to pray for us. And amazingly, He does!

As our reading in Hebrews says, Jesus Christ “is able for all times to save those who approach God through Him.” Jesus Christ, the Perfect Son of God the Father, died for us and now lives to intercede for us – always!

He is our Mediator, the One Whom Job wanted to be his advocate in the heavenly court room. But, thanks be to Christ, that courtroom no longer exists! That ancient trial between faith and doubt, life and death, good and evil was won for all forever when Christ overcame death.

Before this, however, Jesus “practiced law” by taking case after case to court. He put illness on trial and won health for us. He put all kinds of oppression on trial and won our freedom. He even put nature on trial and calmed the winds and seas. Today’s reading in the Gospel of Mark also shows an example of Jesus’ interceding for us when He put the loss of sight on trial and won our ability to see into spiritual matters that the world cannot see. This, too, was a trial of faith.

Consider, for instance, the blind beggar Bartimaeus sitting beside the road as Jesus walked by. When he heard the footsteps and the name of “Jesus,” Bartimaeus began to shout out, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me.”

Mercy. That’s what Job kept wanting too – the mercy of God, the mercy of his friends, the mercy of townsfolk, the mercy of his wife! And even the most law-abiding of us also wants that. Mercy!

Jesus gave that gift to the blind man – just as God gave wondrously lavish gifts of restoration to Job. But again, the trial of faith first had to be won.

Even in the darkest, loneliest, most skin-scratchingest miserable time, Job’s faith won out! And the faith of Bartimaeus won too. Look again at Mark 10 and see what happens: The blind man hollers at Jesus. Jesus stops in His tracks and calls the man – a blind man who cannot see anything – to come to Him! And Bartimaeus does!

That alone would show faith at work, but according to the Gospel account, the blind man tossed aside his cloak – the one article of clothing that kept him warm. Undoubtedly, that cloak also had some type of pocket or little bag used to hold the coins he received from begging. But Bartimaeus didn’t care! His faith in Jesus’ ability to heal – Jesus’ desire to heal – was so strong that his most necessary possession no longer meant anything to him. The blind man sprang to his feet, threw off his cloak, and came to Jesus, merely by following the sound of the Lord’s voice.

Notice, too, how Jesus ignored the crowd and spoke directly to Bartimaeus, asking him what seems quite obvious. Jesus asked a blind man, “What do you want Me to do for you?”

Didn’t Jesus already know what the man wanted? Of course, He knew! But Bartimaeus needed to put his deepest desire into words, into prayer — and put his faith into action — as he said, “Lord, I want to see.”

Faith comes by hearing.

Hearing comes by The Word of God.

Jesus is The Word of God made manifest on earth.

Today we can hear that word by reading and studying the Bible and listening for God’s response to our unique needs.

Faith also deepens and strengthens as we hear Jesus’ voice echoing throughout Holy Scripture but speaking most clearly in the Gospels. And when we’ve heard and, in faith, believed that Jesus Christ, indeed, is our Savior, our Lawyer, our Advocate, our Mediator, our Intercessor, our Way to spiritual life, we’re ready to toss aside everything else as we walk – faithfully, but sometimes blindly – toward the Lord.

Dear Heavenly Father, thank You for seeing us! Thank You for knowing our needs yet graciously asking us, “What would you like for Me to do for you?”

Help us to respond to You in faith, truth, and sincerity, and be ready to accept Your forgiveness, healing, and restoration of us and the many relationships in our lives. Draw us closer to You, Lord. Help us to trust You to take care of us. Help us to see You clearly, worship You, and follow Your way for us in Jesus’ name, amen.

 

3 ways to get closer to God

Each of these spiritual disciplines provides the basis for a sermon, article, or beginnings of a book. May God guide you as you communicate – clearly, accurately, and lovingly – for Christ.

Pray:

Matthew 6:9 – As Jesus taught us “This is how you’re to pray: Our Father Who is in heaven, hallowed be Your name….”

Mark 11:24 – Jesus said, “Truly, I tell you, whatever you ask in prayer, believe you’ll receive, and it shall be yours.”

Psalm 122:6 – “Pray for the peace of Jerusalem!”

1 Thessalonians 5:17 – “Pray constantly.”

Romans 8:26-27 – “The Holy Spirit comes to help us in our weakness. For we do not know how to pray as we should, but the Spirit intercedes with groans that cannot be expressed. And the one who searches our hearts knows the intention of the Spirit, Who intercedes for us according to God’s will.”

Ephesians 6:18 – “Be alert! In every situation, pray in the Spirit. Use every kind of prayer and request for God’s people.”

Matthew 5:44 – As Jesus told us, “Love your enemies. Pray for those who mistreat you.”

Mark 11:25 – Jesus also taught, “When you stand to pray, forgive anyone against whom you have a complaint or grudge, so your heavenly Father may forgive your offenses.”

Confess:

Psalm 32:1-6 – “When I kept silent about my sins, even my bones ached from groaning. Your hand felt heavy upon me, and my strength drained as in summer heat! But when I acknowledged my sin and no longer tried to hide it, You forgave me and took away my guilt.”

Proverbs 28:13 – “Those who conceal their sins do not prosper. Those who confess and turn from their wrongdoing will receive mercy.”

1 John 1:9 – “If we confess our sins, God is faithful and just and will forgive us and purify us from all unrighteousness.”

James 5:16 – “And so, confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another, so you may be healed.”

Romans 10:9 – “If you confess aloud that Jesus is Lord and believe that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved.”

Worship:

1 Chronicles 16:29 – “Give to the Lord the glory due His name! Bow down before Him. Bring your gifts of worship to the Lord, Whose holiness is splendid.”

2 Maccabees 1:3 – “May God give you all a heart to worship Him and do His will sincerely with a willing spirit.”

Matthew 4:10 – Jesus said, “Get away, Tempter! As it is written, ‘you shall worship the Lord, your God, and God alone shall you serve.’”

John 4:21-24 – “Indeed, the time is coming – and is here – when true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and in truth. Indeed, the Father seeks such people to worship Him. For God is spirit, and those who worship Him must worship in spirit and in truth.”

Revelation 4:11 – “O, Lord our God, You alone are worthy to receive glory and honor and power for You created all things. Through Your will all creation came to be.”

Psalm 100, King James Version (KJV)
“Make a joyful noise unto the Lord, all ye lands. Serve the Lord with gladness: come before His presence with singing. Know ye that the Lord is God: it is He Who hath made us, and not we ourselves; we are His people, and the sheep of His pasture. Enter into His gates with thanksgiving, and into His courts with praise: be thankful unto Him, and bless His name. For the Lord is good; His mercy is everlasting; and His truth endures to all generations.”

Compiled by Mary Sayler, ©2018, following word searches of various translations found on Bible Gateway.

The Theology of Pronouns!

When Moses asked God to identify Himself in Genesis 3:14, the Lord answered in Hebrew, “YHWH,” which we translate as Yahweh or Anglicize as Jehovah. Either way it means, “I AM Who I AM.”

I AM I.

In Roman numerals, a capital I = one.

I AM One.

Over and over, God tells individuals, “I AM with you,” for example in Jeremiah 30:11, Ezekiel 37:14, and Acts 18:10, but in John 14:20, Jesus speaks to all of His followers:

“Then you will know I AM in My Father and you in Me and I in you.”

Jesus Christ is One with God.
We are One in Christ.
I AM One is with us and in us.

We are One!

Praise God!

So be it.

Amen.

Mary Harwell Sayler, ©2018